Coronavirus Catch Up Premium

Covid 19 Catch Up Premium Funding (2020 – 2021)

Roseberry Pupils Soar

At Roseberry our vision is summed up through the above mission statement. We believe that our children should not be defined by their socio-economic circumstances, ethnicity or gender status. We expect them to achieve the very best that they are capable of in readiness for their future lives.

We are committed to ensuring that all children have the opportunity to catch up to their age related expectations at the earliest point. However, as 49% of pupils are eligible for Pupil Premium Funding school recognises the specific difficulties caused by Covid-19 with regards this particular group.

“Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are likely to have been more affected particularly severely by closures and may need more support to return to school and settle back into school life. Whilst all pupils will benefit from the EEF recommendations, it is likely that some forms of support will be particularly beneficial to disadvantaged.”

(Covid-19 Support Guide for Schools – June 2020)

Funding Allocation

Schools’ allocations will be calculated on a per pupil basis, providing each mainstream school with a total of £80 for each pupil in years reception through to 11.

Payments

This funding will be provided in 3 tranches. We will provide schools with an initial part payment in autumn 2020, based on the latest available data on pupils. We will then distribute a second grant payment in early 2021, based on updated pupil and place data. For mainstream schools, we will use the 4 to 15 pupil headcount from the October 2020 census.

The second grant payment will also take account of the initial part payment made in autumn 2020 so that schools will receive a total of £46.67 per pupil. A further £33.33 per pupil will be paid during the summer term 2021.

Though funding has been calculated on a per pupil basis, schools should use the sum available to them as a single total from which to prioritise support for pupils according to their need.

As the catch-up premium has been designed to mitigate the effects of the unique disruption caused by coronavirus (COVID-19), the grant will only be available for the 2020 to 2021 academic year. It will not be added to schools’ baselines in calculating future years’ funding allocations.

Use of funds

 Schools should use this funding for specific activities to support their pupils to catch up for lost teaching over the previous months, in line with the guidance on curriculum expectations for the next academic year. (See also EEF – School Planning Guide 2020-21 ) Schools have the flexibility to spend their funding in the best way for their cohort and circumstances

Accountability and monitoring

As with all government funding, school leaders must be able to account for how this money is being used to achieve our central goal of schools getting back on track and teaching a normal curriculum as quickly as possible. Given their role in ensuring schools spend funding appropriately and in holding schools to account for educational performance, governors and trustees should scrutinise schools’ approaches to catch-up from September, including their plans for and use of catch-up funding. This should include consideration of whether schools are spending this funding in line with their catch-up priorities, and ensuring appropriate transparency for parents. (DfE guidance – Coronavirus (COVID-19) catch-up premium – updated 24/08/2020)

  School Overview

Number of Pupils (R – Y6) Funding Allocated Review Date
372 Autumn – 372 x £80 = £29, 760 Feb 2021

Barriers to Future Attainment

Barriers Outcomes
A Children do not have access to digital technology (including computers and the internet), which is needed for most remote learning. A strong remote learning strategy is in place that children know how to access and staff are confident to use.

School knows which families need support with access and devices. School provides support for those families.

B Children do not have the necessary equipment for home learning School to provide work packs including stationery equipment so that children can access learning via means other than digital
C Children’s ability to read with fluency, speed and understanding was hampered due to lack of reading whilst not at school There is accelerated progress in reading (comprehension and speed). Children enjoy reading. Children gain information facts to support wider learning from a range of text types.
D Attendance has been affected due to some families feeling anxious about the spread of the virus Families feel happy to attend school and ask school for support if they need it.
E Children may struggle with settling back in to school and class routines and have difficulty with concentration All children attend school on time and engage in their learning with increased concentration
F Peer interactions cannot take place in the same way and children could feel isolated (at school as well as at home) Different approaches to peer action including peer marking, sharing models of good work and opportunities for discussions enable pupils to be motivated and learning outcomes improved

 

 Planned Covid 19 Expenditure for 2020 – 2021

Barrier Action Intended Outcome Rationale for this Choice Implementation Cost Review
Children do not have access to digital technology (including computers and the internet), which is needed for most remote learning. Parent/child questionnaire to establish skill set and access to devices and the internet.

 

Staff training in the use of Seesaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home learning clubs set up to support implementation of home learning

 

 

 

Ipads purchased for in school and home use

School knows which families need support with home learning

 

 

Staff know how to use Seesaw confidently to deliver learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children attend clubs and gain understanding of how to use Seesaw

 

 

 

There are sufficient devices in school for children to use and enough for home loans

School knows where to target support

 

 

 

Seesaw facilitates peer interactions. EEF highlights the importance of peer interaction during remote learning, as a way to motivate pupils and improve outcomes.

 

Children needed to know how to use Seesaw to respond to set tasks at home.

 

 

EEF states that lack of technology is a major barrier to home learning as most remote learning relies on it

Questionnaire analysed and target group identified

 

 

 

Purchase Seesaw

All staff attended a series of CPD sessions on different aspects of Seesaw.

 

 

 

 

 

Staff held additional homework sessions on Seesaw after school and supported children with difficulties.

 

40 iPads purchased and distributed to children who need them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£4,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£10, 600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children do not have the necessary equipment for home learning School to order sufficient CGP books and equipment for individual children

CGP books to be used in class alongside the curriculum and then sent home in the event of absence

All children will be able to access learning in a non-digital way Lack of equipment is a barrier to home learning

 

Provision of CGP books enables parents to understand what is being taught

Packs sent out to children along with timetables when self-isolation has started

 

Year group emails allow parent/child contact with teaching staff

CGP books £14,000

 

 

 

Pencil cases £1,500

 
Children’s ability to read with fluency, speed and understanding was hampered due to lack of reading whilst not at school Baseline assessment completed.

Target readers identified.

Additional reading support given via teaching staff and Reading Plus

Children catch up to their age related expectations (or appropriate level for their ability) EEF states that language and literature provides us with the building blocks for all other learning

Exposure to reading with a trained member of staff increases attainment

Baseline assessments used to analyse gaps

Children grouped according to need

Targeted readers for individual work

Reading Plus increased to up to 5x per week for target children including supported reading plus

School focus on linking reading with topics

 

Reading Plus – already costed

 

Individual reading time – 120 children x 30 mins per week per child

 

£1,000

 
Attendance has been affected due to some families feeling anxious about the spread of the virus School therapist has worked with a number of parents, teaching staff and lunchtime staff to support with their anxieties

School therapist works with individual children to support their anxieties

Education Welfare and PSA support with children attending school

 

Children attend school, are happy and make progress with their learning

 

Staff are able to attend work

If children are not accessing education then their future life chances reduce

 

Children in school are seen regularly by staff and any concerns are raised immediately

Teaching staff and senior leadership identify parents who are struggling School therapist costs £40 per hour

 

10 x £40 x 6 sessions = £2,400

 

 

 

 

 
Children may struggle with settling back in to school and class routines and have difficulty with concentration All staff use the Relationships and Health framework to plan and deliver lessons

 

Additional mental well-being breaks have been built in to the timetable

 

Teaching times have been shortened supporting attention and concentration

 

Additional sensory toys have been purchased to support children who have difficulty with regulation

 

Children are happy and settled in school. They are able to engage in their work and make enhanced progress from their starting points. EEF – Interventions which target social and emotional learning seek to improve pupils’ interactions with others and self-management of emotions. Children make on average 4 months additional progress on attainment after intervention focused on mental well-being Clear routines and expectations are established immediately.

Children who are struggling are supported and given strategies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional support and equipment purchased including cleaning products £3,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sensory toys £300

 
Peer interactions cannot take place in the same way and children could feel isolated (at school as well as at home) Seesaw used to engage learners in discussing, sharing and marking

 

Peer mentor to take place across classrooms using whiteboards and Zoom/Teams

“Circle time” to be used for discussion and exploration of feelings

Playtimes to take place in class groupings

Sports leaders developing challenges via recorded messages to support mental well-being

Classrooms to be set up to accommodate children sitting in pairs

Children do not feel isolated or demotivated.

Children continue to have a voice in the class and are able to share ideas.

LA children are supported by others through online devices or by whiteboard work

 

 

Children are able to play with friends in their class and can take part in sporting challenges

 

 

 

 

Children are able to work in pairs to support each other

EEF highlights the importance of peer interaction during remote learning, as a way to motivate pupils and improve outcomes.

 

Different ways of allowing group work and paired interactions to take place are used

Hand washing and sanitising to be completed at regular intervals throughout the day so that the risk of infection is controlled and children can remain in school

 

 

 

 

 

Sanitising sprays/equipment

£500

 
                                                                                                                                                                             Total cost £37,300